Introduction To SimpleWater Lead Series

Lead in Water

If you’ve been tuned into national news at all, you heard about it: Lead.

And it isn’t just the publicized disaster in Flint, Michigan, either. The lead crisis extends far beyond the confines of that city, with recent water rests at homes and public schools across the country dredging up the reality that there are few among us currently enjoying sanctuary from this public health threat.

In fact, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) data obtained by CNBC reveals that only nine U.S. states report lead levels in compliance with  federal drinking water standards. Those states that are suffering from lead violations in drinking water put their citizens—particularly children—at risk for fertility impairment, vomiting, anemia, hearing loss, kidney disease, and developmental delays, among other ailments.

With the public discourse so focused on the lead threat—even the 2016 United States presidential race turned its attention to the health crisis—we wanted to create a one-stop special lead series for you to learn about what we know so far. We also mapped home age and water corrosiveness as indicators of risk so that you can check out your neighborhood and assess whether or not lead or heavy metals might be a risk in your water–see the Simple Water Lead Map.

Get up to date on the lead public health crisis that swept the country in 2016-17 with the following articles:

Flint, Michigan & Corrosive River Water: Flint remains a city-wide public health crisis that has yet to be remedied. Inside, we discuss the grave mistakes made in Michigan that we all stand to gain so much in learning from.

Erin Brockovich as Spokesperson: We examine how Erin Brockovich’s involvement in the largest direct-action lawsuit in history prepped her to intervene on behalf of Flint, and how her involvement helped motivate President Obama to mobilize the National Guard and declare a state of emergency in Michigan.

Lead in U.S. Cities: Which cities are America’s most egregious water quality violators? We break down the story on municipalities encountering difficulties meeting federal public health guidelines for lead levels in drinking water.

Lead in U.S. Public School Water: Lead in drinking water isn’t just a problem for Flint, Michigan. Learn how America’s public schools are at risk, and peruse a roundup of school districts recently affected.

Young Children and Lead Water Contamination: The Harmful Consequences: It’s an unfortunate fact that the youngest in our society are the most susceptible to environmental hazards, including lead. We discuss why lead in drinking water is so perilous to our children, and the specific adverse health effects they may encounter as a result of exposure.

Can You Trust Store-bought Lead Water Testing Kits? Not all lead water testing kits are created equal, as reporter Alison Young for USA TODAY quickly discovered. Many testing kits are backed by suspect “certifications,” and either rely on analysis from labs with questionable credentials or include testing procedures that often give rise to user error.

As we continue to follow lead in water around the nation, we’ll dutifully keep you updated. We've done our homework bringing together data on home age and corrosive water to map out areas across the nation that might be at risk for lead. Check out the Simple Water Lead Map here. Check back with us often to stay current  on the latest news and developments. 

And of course, if you’re ready to take action now to learn what’s in your water, check out Tap Score. Tap Score makes it simple for you to screen your home’s drinking water for more than 100 known contaminants, including lead. We’ll tell you what’s in your water and what you can do about it. Learn more about our testing packages now.


SimpleWater: We Test, Therefore We Know.

A note from the caring folks at SimpleWater — We are a water testing, analysis and health data company intent on providing the best water testing, analysis and reporting service ever created. 

We serve homes, families and businesses asking: “what’s in my water, what does it mean, and how do I ensure the safety of what I’m drinking?”

SimpleWater’s national team of certified laboratory scientists, engineers, health experts and designers provide each customer with a personalized Tap Score Water Quality Report. SimpleWater’s Tap Score is the Nation’s First Smart Water Testing Service for affordable and informative contaminant screening and personalized treatment recommendations.

Call Anytime :: 888 34 MY WATER (+1-888-346-9928)

 

Find Out What’s In Your Water at MyTapScore.Com

United States Earns a “D” on 2017 Drinking Water Infrastructure Report Card

United States civil infrastructure is deteriorating.

Aging and groaning under increasing strain year after year, massive investments are necessary in the near future to ensure that our nation's infrastructure can keep pace with a growing population and continue to operate in the way Americans have grown to expect: without much trouble.

The American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) estimates that the United States must invest approximately $3.6 trillion in infrastructure repairs and improvements by 2020. In 2013 it was estimated that our country is shy of this amount by $1.6 trillion. Particularly maligned sectors include energy, transit, aviation, levees, dams, roads, schools, waterways, hazardous waste, wastewater, and, yes, drinking water.

All of the above sectors received a D+ score—or worse— in the most recent ASCE Infrastructure Report Card in 2017. The overall U.S. infrastructure grade was set at a D+, which not so inspiringly manages to be an improvement over the D grade the civil engineering body awarded U.S. infrastructure in 2009.

The drinking water category specifically was awarded a meager “D” in the 2017 report.

It’s clear that many challenges are ahead, but because we’re a water-focused company, let’s take a brief look at the problem of U.S. drinking water infrastructure and what it means for your water quality and your wallet.

What is the U.S. Drinking Water Infrastructure Situation?

The country’s drinking water infrastructure is now approaching the end of its useful life.

After all, U.S. infrastructure was originally constructed approximately 75 to 100 years ago. It was never meant to hold up for much longer than it has. We've more than reached our “due date” for a required infrastructure overhaul on many pipes, mains, and channels. 

The American Water Works Association (AWWA) documents that there are approximately 240,000 water main breaks every year in the United States. If one were to assume that each pipe required replacement, the cost from this alone would likely reach $1 trillion (per AWWA).

Fortunately, drinking water quality overall remains “high,” particularly in relation to other parts of the world. Still, there’s no getting past the fact that many of the mains and pipes in the U.S. are now more than a century old, meaning they require large scale investments sooner rather than later.

And despite an overall high quality of drinking water, cities like Flint, Michigan demonstrate that aging pipes can lead to dangerous health problems when not managed properly. If drinking water infrastructure needs continue to be ignored, water quality in this country will eventually experience a sharp downturn.

What the Government Can Do About the Drinking Water Infrastructure Situation

"We must commit today to investing in modern, efficient infrastructure systems to position the U.S. for economic prosperity," said ASCE President Gregory E. DiLoreto, P.E. to CBS News. "Infrastructure can either be the engine for long-term economic growth and employment, or, it can jeopardize our nation's standing if poor roads, deficient bridges, and failing waterways continue to hurt our economy."

Indeed, the best thing we can hope for on a macro level are government infrastructure investments. Elizabeth McNichol, a senior fellow at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, says:

There’s lots to be done. Investments in well-maintained roads, railroads, airports and ports, as well as well-functioning water and sewer systems, help businesses and communities thrive. State-of-the art schools free from crowding and safety hazards improve educational opportunities for future workers.

McNichol also suggests that states target investment in their low-income areas, as she notes that these localities are at greatest risk for problems such as aging lead pipes that are known to leach lead into drinking water—a well-established human health risk.

 The ASCE estimates there are approximately 240,000 water main breaks every year in the U.S. Put differently, our aging pipes are wasting 2.1 trillion gallons of water a year. Put another way, Chicago’s Center for Neighborhood Technology estimates approximately 6 billion gallons of water is lost each day. These staggering numbers demand immediate action, but there remains a looming question: who will pay?

01-rethink-what-you-drink-faucet.jpg

Who will pay: private, public, or private equity?

Public, private, or private equity. These are the three main modes of financing infrastructure development in the U.S, with the latter being relatively new and potentially controversial.

Public sector funding often comes from tax-dollars through propositions in states like California or federally-sponsored bonds. Essentially this type of infrastructure financing is through taxpayer dollars.

Private sector funding requires companies to invest and operate water infrastructure projects. Cost-recovery for projects is often passed on to consumers through their water bill.

A third financing option is the basis for the public infrastructure funding strategy of the current president: private equity. Private equity financing brings bankers and hedge funds together with municipalities to finance projects. Though initially appealing–cities can get large sums of capital up front at low interest rates–cities experimenting with private equity water infrastructure investment have frequently found themselves beholden to shareholder values rather than citizen values of safe, affordable drinking water. Cost recovery for projects is often attended with an agreed-upon fixed return on investment for the investors. Private equity funding is currently a minority of drinking water infrastructure investment, and several deals have made headlines for controversial price hikes and poor management oversight.

What You Can Do About Your Drinking Water

While major investments by federal and state governments are critical to the U.S. drinking water infrastructure’s health in the near future, there’s no distinct timetable for their implementation.

Fortunately, you don’t have to wait for authorities to take action or learn about how our D-grade water infrastructure impacts your water quality. Check out Tap Score to learn more.

 

SimpleWater: We Test, Therefore We Know.

A note from the caring folks at SimpleWater — We are a water testing, analysis and health data company intent on providing the best water testing, analysis and reporting service ever created. 

We serve homes, families and businesses asking: “what’s in my water, what does it mean, and how do I ensure the safety of what I’m drinking?”

SimpleWater’s national team of certified laboratory scientists, engineers, health experts and designers provide each customer with a personalized Tap Score Water Quality Report. SimpleWater’s Tap Score is the Nation’s First Smart Water Testing Service for affordable and informative contaminant screening and personalized treatment recommendations.

Call Anytime :: 888 34 MY WATER (+1-888-346-9928)

Find Out What’s In Your Water at MyTapScore.Com

Can You Trust Store-Bought Lead Water Testing Kits?

SimpleWater Can You Trust Testing Kits?

In 2016, Alison Young of USA TODAY decided to investigate whether her 136-year-old home suffered from lead water contamination.

Homes serviced with lead pipes, fixtures, or solder are at risk of lead contamination, regardless of the quality of the water before it reaches your home. Sagely noting that “even if your water company is in compliance with federal lead contamination regulations, it doesn’t mean the water in your home is safe,” Young cited her desire to learn more about the potential threats facing her own home’s water supply.

Unfortunately, Young was quickly put off by the process of working with her local utility. Tired of receiving vague answers and delays from her water company, Virginia American Water, Young decided to take matters into her own hands with a home water testing kit.

The Pro-Lab Water Testing Kit Controversy

Young initially turned to Pro-Lab’s lead testing kit, which she discovered while browsing her local Home Depot.

The Pro-Lab Lead in Water Test Kit cost Young $9.99 at retail. This does not include a $30.00 lab fee that is charged once the user sends their home’s water vials off for testing.

Promising an “EPA approved laboratory method,” the water test kit’s packaging reads “IAC2 Certified,” although the fine print discloses that this acronym stands for the “International Associations of Certified Indoor Air Consultants.”

Immediately concerned over the nature of this certification and how it might apply to water tests, Young attempted over the course of two days to get in touch with Pro-Lab representatives. Eventually, Pro-Lab Chief Executive James McDonell contacted Young, and admitted that the International Associations of Certified Indoor Air Consultants “doesn’t have expertise in water testing”, and instead works with home inspectors. (Although per their website, lead issues do fall under their general purview.) McDonell asserted that they endorse all of Pro-Lab’s test kits.

Through spokesmen Stephen Holmes and Kylie Mason, both Home Depot and the Florida Attorney General’s Office, respectively, have informed Young they are investigating the claims put forth by Pro-Lab and their Lead In Water Test Kit regarding the kit’s efficacy and certifications.

Pro-Lab: forced to outsource testing

In the interim, Young did some digging, and found records revealing that Pro-Lab dished out $20,000 to the Florida Attorney General in 2008 for misrepresenting their Lead Surface Test Kit as a trusted source for EPA, when no such evidence existed. Additionally, Young claims these records show that Pro-Lab is “no longer certified” as a drinking water lab.

Pro-Lab’s water testing is now outsourced to Florida Spectrum, which is currently certified. They tout being the first South Florida lab to be certified by the Florida Department of Health.

While Pro-Lab is no longer certified to conduct their own testing as a drinking water lab, their website still claims a number of health-related certifications, inspections, licenses, recognitions, accreditations, affiliations, endorsements, and proficiency tests from various bodies, including the The Lead and Environmental Hazards Association (LEHA) and the National Lead Abatement and Assessment Council (NLAAC). However, Pro-Lab does not divulge what agency or association provides which certification, endorsement, et cetera. No specifics are provided.

A Trial with Two Other At-Home Lead Testing Kits

Inspired by Young’s findings, we decided to conduct a bit of our own research on home lead testing kits. The following are two examples:

H20 OK Plus Test Kit

Cost: This is another water testing kit that Young herself tested. It’s available at a number of prominent retailers, including Home Depot ($28.98 plus tax) and Lowe’s ($24.98 plus tax).

Testing Attributes: H20 OK Plus Test Kit contains 23 drinking-water-quality tests. To perform the test at home you’re instructed to put two droppers worth of water from your tap into the test vial.  Then, you drop the lead test strip alongside the pesticide test strip into the water vial.  Next, you wait 10 minutes (not unlike a home pregnancy test) to see instant results about the presence or absence of lead and pesticides in your tap water.

Weaknesses: Manufacturer Mosser Lee's website notes that the test tube and a recording log for cataloging test results are included. However, Young notes that while instructions for reading the results are also included, there are no instructions on how to take the water sample in the first place.

This is particularly worrisome considering Mosser Lee’s own statement at the bottom of their product page asserts:

H20 OK and H2O OK Plus Test Kits tests are screening tests and are not meant to certify water as safe or unsafe for drinking. LabTech tests provide approximate results only when used in strict accordance with instructions. LabTech and its affiliates expressly disclaim any liability resulting from the use of these products, failure to follow instructions or reliance of test results.

It is concerning that results are dependent on strict accordance with incomplete instructions.

Additionally, the company that developed H20 OK Plus Test Kit’s test-strip technology, Silver Lake, explained to Young through spokesperson Mark Geisberg that the test doesn’t test for “particulate lead,” which are small grains of lead that still pose a health risk.

Certifications: Silver Lake’s spokesperson told Young and USA TODAY that no government agency certifies or verifies these types of home lead test kits. As the vials are never sent off for testing, there is no outside lab involved that carries any certifications, either.

PurTest Lead Test

We checked into yet another at-home lead testing kit option, the PurTest Lead Test from American Water Service LLC out of North Carolina.

Cost: Amazon lists PurTest at $16 currently, although other outlets list the price as low as $12.

Testing Attributes: Describing itself as a “rapid immunoassay test of lead in drinking water,” the PurTest Lead Test claims it can “detect lead at very low levels, even below the EPA action level of 15 ppb.” They also promise results in 10 minutes, and guide users to their website if they have any questions.

Users must fill a sample vial with their home drinking water and then place a test strip within the vial. After ten minutes, blue lines appear on the strip. Depending on which of the two blue lines is darkest, users will be alerted as to whether their water is contaminated with lead.

Weaknesses: PurTest notes in their documentation that “PurTest is a screening test and cannot be used to certify water as safe or unsafe for drinking.” It provides “approximate results.” Like Mosser Lee’s H20 OK Plus Test Kit, the PurTest Lead Test is a do-it-yourself home test that relies on the user to both correctly administer the test and interpret the results.

Certifications: The front of the box for PurTest says “Laboratory Certified,” but it’s unclear through available online documentation what that certification entailed. Both PurTest and the American Water Service list themselves as members of the Water Quality Association, although it is unclear whether PurTest is backed by a WQA-certification.

Double Check before you Test

If there’s one thing Young’s research for USA TODAY and our own follow-up digging indicate, it is that you can’t fully trust a lead or water testing kit to deliver reliable and accurate results without doing some homework first:

  1. Compare & Review. Before buying, it's important to compare across test kits, read reviews, and research the at-home kit company.

  2. Certifications & Instructions. If you decide on an at-home test, make sure you understand an at-home test's certifications and instructions.

Finally, even if a test is adequately performed at home, the job ends here. At home test-kits deliver information about a handful of contaminants about your water quality, so these test do not paint the full picture of what is in your water. Additionally, water quality can change over time, so be sure to re-test if you taste, smell, or hear about any changes in the water quality. 

The ideal case: go through a state-certified lab

SimpleWater recommends having your water tested through the use of a lead test kit recommended by the state or other government authority, and analyzed by a water quality laboratory accredited by the same government authority.

 

SimpleWater: We Test, Therefore We Know.

A note from the caring folks at SimpleWater — We are a water testing, analysis and health data company intent on providing the best water testing, analysis and reporting service ever created. 

We serve homes, families and businesses asking: “what’s in my water, what does it mean, and how do I ensure the safety of what I’m drinking?”

SimpleWater’s national team of certified laboratory scientists, engineers, health experts and designers provide each customer with a personalized Tap Score Water Quality Report. SimpleWater’s Tap Score is the Nation’s First Smart Water Testing Service for affordable and informative contaminant screening and personalized treatment recommendations.

Call Anytime :: 888 34 MY WATER (+1-888-346-9928)

Find Out What’s In Your Water at MyTapScore.Com

How To Maintain A Private Well and Your Drinking Water

Source: Wikipedia.

Source: Wikipedia.

SimpleWater's Basic Water Well Maintenance Guide

If you have specific questions, email us using the form at the bottom of the article.

While we’ve come a long way since the hand-dug wells of Egypt and other ancient civilizations, modern wells are still susceptible to a range of issues that may affect the quality of your home’s drinking water.

Thirty-eight percent of America’s population relies on groundwater for its drinking supply.  Private wells must be properly installed, inspected, and tested on a regular basis in order to ensure groundwater quality. And the thing is… you are responsible for the maintenance and care of your private well system.

If you’re one of the 38%, what can you do to ensure your well water is safe and contaminant-free?

Answer: Quite a lot, actually. The following is a quick and simple how-to guide:

1. Check your well for proper construction and installation.

While you’ll definitely be in a pickle if your well was originally constructed in a poor fashion, it’s important to first determine whether you’re at risk of water woes due to the nature of your well’s installation.

There are a few matters to check for here. First, the casing of your well should be capped off by a sanitary seal/concrete cover that stands approximately 12” above ground. This keeps unwanted pests and surface water out. Second, you’ll want to make sure that your well was installed a minimum of 50 feet from your septic tank and at least 100 feet from the septic system’s drainage field, although these distances can vary depending upon state regulations. Finally, the ground surrounding your well should slope away from the well in order to prevent water pooling.

2. Clear the area around your well.

It’s important to keep the area surrounding your well free of undesirable elements, including fertilizers, pesticides, motor oil, and general debris. Any of these examples—including other forms of waste—can contaminate your well if used or stored  in close proximity.

3. Perform regular well inspections.

You should give your well a close look at least once a year, even if you know your well was properly constructed. Over time, cracks and other forms of corrosion can occur that compromise the integrity of your well and the quality of your home’s drinking water. If you observe that there may be an issue, or if it has been over three years since a professional has inspected your well, contact a contractor licensed to perform well inspections.

Source: https://i.ytimg.com/vi/wsVoCRD67_8/maxresdefault.jpg

Source: https://i.ytimg.com/vi/wsVoCRD67_8/maxresdefault.jpg

4. Close off any wells no longer in use.

Improperly abandoned wells pose a threat. Those that have not been sealed off can act  as a surface water conduit that might contaminate groundwater. Wells no longer in use can be correctly sealed by a licensed well contractor before they are abandoned.

5. Have your water tested yearly.

Even if your well has been properly built, placed, and has passed all inspections, it is still important to test your drinking water. Off-the-shelf at-home water tests are not usually complete, but they can be useful initial screens, especially if you know what to test for. SimpleWater’s Tap Score is developed with private well owners in mind. Tap Score tests for lead, arsenic, nitrate, heavy metals, pharmaceuticals, and other known well-water contaminants. We test for over 100 contaminants and then provide you with a personalized water quality report, complete with actionable recommendations.

Learn more about how Tap Score works today.


SimpleWater: We Test, Therefore We Know.

A note from the caring folks at SimpleWater — We are a water testing, analysis and health data company intent on providing the best water testing, analysis and reporting service ever created. 

We serve homes, families and businesses asking: “what’s in my water, what does it mean, and how do I ensure the safety of what I’m drinking?”

SimpleWater’s national team of certified laboratory scientists, engineers, health experts and designers provide each customer with a personalized Tap Score Water Quality ReportSimpleWater’s Tap Score is the Nation’s First Smart Water Testing Service for affordable and informative contaminant screening and personalized treatment recommendations.

Call Anytime :: 888 34 MY WATER (+1-888-346-9928)

Find Out What’s In Your Water at MyTapScore.Com

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How Fracking Water Becomes Your Water

Fracking has polluted aquifers across the United States. This is a major problem for millions of Americans drinking groundwater and surface water.

Hydraulic Fracturing and US Water Quality

“Hydraulic fracturing” – or “fracking,” for short– is an advanced method of natural gas extraction that has drawn the attention of environmentalists and water quality activists in recent years. Instead of traditional gas wells, which drill deep into large, pre-existing pockets of natural gas (methane) underground, fracking wells drill into “shale” rock containing gas-filled cracks. Hundreds of chemicals and millions of gallons of water are then pumped into the well under high pressure to break open the cracks in the shale.This releases the natural gas, which is then brought up to the surface and distributed to power plants, homes, and businesses.

While some hail fracking as the key to unlocking U.S. energy independence, others argue that it is dangerous to the environment and polluting drinking wells nationwide.

Unfortunately, it’s becoming clear that some existing fracking operations have polluted aquifers and groundwater in the United States – and this is a major problem, because aquifers and groundwater are the source of tap water for millions of Americans. Though the injection of chemicals, extraction of toxic wastewater, and capturing of natural gas are supposed to happen within a secure and contained system, but human and technical failures are inevitable in every project.

Shoddy well construction, wastewater storage failures, and shallow surface wells allow pollutants to enter freshwater aquifers.

Experts have discovered a number of substances in drinking water near fracking operations, and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) also recently published a report which confirms the connection between fracking operations and groundwater pollution. Pollutants include known carcinogens, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and radionuclides. A 2011 study also found that methane levels were significantly higher in water wells near fracking sites than those farther away. 

Some residents living near fracking sites have even been able to light their tap water on fire due to elevated methane levels; see the documentary Gasland for similar findings. Others have reported discolored and foul-smelling tap water and a variety of health issues potentially related to their exposure.

Fracking causes pollution in a number of ways. Some common ways that used fracking water enters our water supply are:

  • Poor well construction
  • Wastewater storage failures
  • Shallow surface wells

Poor well construction

Water and chemicals are pumped under high pressure through the ground, and much of that water-chemical mix travels back to the surface with natural gas through concrete-lined wells. This wastewater--now mixed with methane and rock--is even more toxic than the chemical mix pumped down to frack the shale gas.. If there are any cracks in the concrete-lined wells that carry wastewater back up, fracking fluids with methane can leak out into the soil and the underground aquifers that provide drinking water.

Wastewater storage failures

When wastewater it is pumped back to the surface, it is either put in open-air evaporation pits or taken to water treatment facilities off-site. There are very few safety regulations for evaporation pits – and if pits are poorly lined, fracking waste can leach through the soil and contaminate both soils and groundwater.

Additionally, not enough treatment facilities exist to handle the loads of wastewater coming from wells, and many facilities don’t even have the technology to deal with the cancer-causing and radioactive chemicals in wastewater. This can create “treated” water that isn’t completely clean, posing dangers when it’s released. The lack of treatment facilities has also led some companies to leave highly-toxic wastewater behind in evaporation pits.  

Shallow surface wells

In other cases, wells are dug to tap into gas reserves that are too close to the surface. Shale deposits are typically 5,000 to 6,000 feet underground, but sometimes developers harvest gas from shallower deposits as low as 700 feet. This “shallow” fracking is increasingly common, especially in the western US. According to Robert Jackson, an earth scientist at Stanford University and author in a study of Wyoming drinking water, about half of the wells in California are around 2000 feet or less.  Here, groundwater flows upward in response to the well pressures can cause contaminated fracking waste to flow upward and contaminate drinking water sources without the problem of well and infrastructure integrity.

Are you in a state with fracking operations?

As of April 2016, 21 states have fracking operations, as seen in the map created by Inside Climate News below: California, Utah, Colorado, Wyoming, Montana, North Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas, Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, West Virginia, Virginia, Pennsylvania. 5 more could begin operation soon: Nevada, Illinois, North Carolina, Florida, and Alaska. Maryland, New York, Vermont and Massachusetts had state bans or moratoria, and there are several local cities and counties with bans or moratoria.

Source: Inside Climate News. 

Source: Inside Climate News. 


This nationwide look at the fracking operations shows that a majority of states are active with fracking operations. Residents in states with active fracking operations should keep an eye on their water’s taste, look, and smell – and ideally test it to see if there are any dangerous pollutants. This is all the more important given that fracking is currently exempt from Safe Drinking Water Act restrictions, and industry information is kept largely confidential and operations are not strongly regulated.


SimpleWater: We Test, Therefore We Know.

A note from the caring folks at SimpleWater — We are a water testing, analysis and health data company intent on providing the best water testing, analysis and reporting service ever created. 

We serve homes, families and businesses asking: “what’s in my water, what does it mean, and how do I ensure the safety of what I’m drinking?”

SimpleWater’s national team of certified laboratory scientists, engineers, health experts and designers provide each customer with a personalized Tap Score Water Quality ReportSimpleWater’s Tap Score is the Nation’s First Smart Water Testing Service for affordable and informative contaminant screening and personalized treatment recommendations.

Call Anytime :: 888 34 MY WATER (+1-888-346-9928)

Find Out What’s In Your Water at MyTapScore.Com



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